High speed fiber optic networks allows for faster internet to homes, nonprofit organizations and entities, and businesses and further enables for more productivity in the day-to-day task load, whether it’s sending emails, booking tickets to concerts, or streaming your favorite episode of The Office (aka The Dinner Party). There are a multitude of benefits to having fiber optic connectivity, some of which you can read more about in the article below.


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Flight recorders, otherwise known as a “black box”, are flight instruments that record and store the state and performance of an aircraft during operation. Two components, the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder, are the standard parts that make up each flight recorder. Together, the flight recorder is able to record pertinent information from the aircraft flight instruments and cockpit such as altitude, speed, vertical acceleration, pitch, pilot cockpit communication, radio transmissions, and much more.


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While the average flyer might not be as familiar with aircraft powered by turboprop engines and propellers, they are found in many single, twin and commuter aircraft. Single and twin engine aircraft use the Pratt & Whitney PT-6 turboprop engine, a popular option with power spanning from 500 to 2,000 shaft horsepower.


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The attitude indicator, sometimes known as the artificial horizon, is a flight instrument that denotes an aircraft's orientation relative to the earth's horizon and provides immediate indication of any orientation changes. It shows rotation about the longitudinal axis to indicate the degree of bank, and the lateral axis to display pitch.


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Like automobiles, aircraft mount batteries that are used in the ignition sequence for the engines and auxiliary power unit (APU). Unlike car batteries however, aircraft batteries are responsible for much more. If there is an electrical generation failure during a flight, the batteries will be required to provide power until the aircraft can land, and can also be used to restart the engines if a flame-out occurs.


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Part of a pilot’s qualification is that they are able to fly purely off of the information provided by their instruments. Just as important as this, if not more important, is the ability to recognize errors and malfunctions of those same instruments. Only once a pilot has complete knowledge of their aircraft’s instruments can they safely take flight. Many aircraft flight instruments operate through a pitot-static system. Instruments of this type are usually used to determine factors such as airspeed, mach number, and altitude.


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Control surface failures are thankfully rare, but easily some of the most stressful malfunctions a pilot can face. Occurring mostly during takeoff, a control surface failure compounds an already tense moment, adding to the issues and factors a pilot already faces in such a situation. Thankfully, by keeping a clear head and taking prompt action, the pilot can prevent an accident from occurring.


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An aircraft adheres to similar principles of flight that birds do — it must overcome gravitational forces to achieve lift. In its simplest definition, the wings of an airplane curve the flow of air around them in order to generate lift.


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As you prepare to go on a long car journey, you will likely need to check the fuel levels of your car. Luckily for you, there is a handy dial in the dashboard of your car which indicates your fuel supply. A pilot has a similar routine inside the cockpit, however, the miles covered are significantly more and the implications far more costly. Additionally, the fuel system of an aircraft is far more complex than in a car. Luckily for the pilot, a variety of fuel system indicators provide a comprehensive view of the system’s health.


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On an aircraft, there are multiple electrical systems that play their part in ensuring the proper functioning and sustaining flight. Just like your house needs an electricity source, an aircraft needs a reliable source of power that will not only start up the aircraft but keep it running with all the various aircraft lights and indicators.

There a few key components of an electrical system that are found in all aircraft. While they may be more advanced in some aircraft, the underlying principles and features of an electrical system are the same throughout the various makes and models. There are switches, backup batteries, alternators, and voltage regulators. Like a typical electric system, electrical energy needs to be diverted and stored to prevent system outages.


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A pneumatic system can power a variety of important aircraft operations including aircraft landing gear, air conditioning systems, flight control systems, and more. Whether a high-pressure system of 3000 psi, or a low-pressure system of 1000 psi, pneumatic systems are an integral part of today’s aircraft technology. A wonderful example of the uses of a pneumatic system is in its application on a twin-engine commercial airplane.


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The concept of the o-ring is very similar to that of a gasket. Both are specially designed seals that fill space between two surfaces in order to prevent leakage when a mechanism is static or compressed. An O-ring is designed to act as a seal to prevent fluid leakage in a variety of practicalities, including aircraft pneumatic and hydraulic systems.


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Aircraft material failures are one of the leading causes of aircraft engine failure. One of the most prevalent failures involves aircraft metal fatigue. The term refers to the exposure of metal aircraft components to continuous load stress, which leads to the accumulation of microcracks, and thus the weakening of said components. Determining whether aircraft metal fatigue will occur is not a matter of if, but when. Let’s examine how metal fatigue is caused over the life cycle of an aircraft, and how manufacturers determine fatigue limits and inspection.


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Aircraft was originally designed without brake systems and were able to slow down with the use of slower airspeeds, softer airfield surfaces, and friction developed by the tail skid. Brake systems started becoming more common when aircraft became faster and more complex and are now an integral aspect of an aircraft’s design. There are many different types of brakes and supportive technology used to slow down an aircraft.


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Jet engines are the heart and soul of modern aircraft, making the act of flying at incredible speeds possible. But in order to be sure that they work and it's safe to fly, jet engines need to adhere to strict standards and be rigorously tested for compliance. These standards are primarily for safety, but they're also for efficiency.


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Believe it or not, but traveling by plane is significantly safer than by car. The many protocols, regulations, and safety nets commonly used in aviation simply outclass those implemented in standard vehicles. So, when a plane crashes, it comes instantaneous news and investigators work tirelessly to find out what happened. And their first clue is the aircraft black box.


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Planes can range anywhere from the size of a sedan to the size of the Titanic. And the number of parts they have can range from a couple thousand to the 6,000,000 that the Boeing 747 boasts. To someone who isn't in the business of working with planes, understanding what parts make up a plane can seem daunting and impossible. Fortunately, it's not, because most planes have the same 5 major components that are then broken down into hundreds and thousands of aircraft parts.


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Those who work in the aerospace and aviation industries know better than anyone how important it is to have everything, every piece from the enormous fuselage to the smallest nuts and bolts, be perfect. When it comes to getting massive hunks of metal weighing in the tons to be airborne and fly, every little detail needs to be calculated and accounted for. So, even aviation industrial fasteners, like other metal items and components, are often heat-treated in order to achieve the “perfect” level of rigidity, smoothness, malleability, or strength.


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